Category: Surimono

Photopoetry

Nott (2018:25) describes the origins of photopoetry from the mid-19th century. He considers the most engaging works “combine the visuality of photography and the textuality of poetry to create multisensory sites reliant upon the independence and interdependence of text and image”. Nott also categorises photopoetry into collaborative and retrospective; collaborative is where a photographer and …

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Surimono 5 – Publication

We have now produced 15 images, and it is encouraging that my poetry colleague wishes to continue the collaboration beyond my needs for this course. She is keen to produce a book length collection of images. Twelve of the images have been published on the Plants, People, Planet Facebook account (Plants, People, Planet (Facebook) s.d.) …

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Surimono 4 – Development

Our second piece of collaborative work is called ‘this ambiguous dancer’. The title refers to the form of the flower, the twisted petals, but also to the fact to the unknown identity of the species of flower in the photograph. It was a flower from the garden and I did not know the name of …

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Surimono 3 – What is Surimono?

Surimono (literally ‘printed thing’) originally applied to Japanese woodblock printed material generally, but by the Edo period (1615-1868) the term came to be used for “limited edition, single-sheet woodblock prints that were distributed as private gifts rather than sold commercially” (Hanaoka and Pollard 2018:13). They were often of the highest quality, both in terms of …

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Surimono 2 – Joint working with a poet

I have been looking at Japanese Surimono, literally ‘printed objects’ (Surimono from Osaka and Edo 2008). They are woodblock prints that combine text and images. “The term surimono came to mean prints commissioned by groups for writing kyouka, comic poems, or haiku, 17 syllable poems, as well as prints privately commissioned for New Years greetings” …

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Surimono 1

Surimono are a type of Japanese woodblock prints that combine a printed image with poetry. They were generally privately commissioned and “became very popular in the Edo period (1615-1868), specifically during the later eighteenth century and into the first three to four decades of the nineteenth” (Siffert 1996).  Surimono with butterflies, by Kubo Shunman (1757-1820), …

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